Article

Human Genetics

, Volume 69, Issue 4, pp 371-374

Assignment of human ferritin genes to chromosomes 11 and 19q13.3→19qter

  • M. WorwoodAffiliated withDepartment of Haematology, University of Wales College of Medicine
  • , J. D. BrookAffiliated withSection of Medical Genetics, University of Wales College of Medicine
  • , S. J. CraggAffiliated withDepartment of Haematology, University of Wales College of Medicine
  • , B. HellkuhlAffiliated withInstitut für Humangenetik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität
  • , B. M. JonesAffiliated withDepartment of Haematology, University of Wales College of Medicine
  • , P. PereraAffiliated withDepartment of Haematology, University of Wales College of Medicine
  • , S. H. RobertsAffiliated withCytogenetics Unit, Department of Child Health, University Hospital of Wales
  • , D. J. ShawAffiliated withSection of Medical Genetics, University of Wales College of Medicine

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Summary

Extracts of hamster-human and mouse-human hybrids, some with translocations involving chromosome 19, have been assayed for both human spleen ferritin (rich in L subunits) and human heart ferritin (rich in H subunits). Hybrid lines retaining part of the long arm of chromosome 19 including the region 19q13.3→19qter produced human “L” type ferritin. This confirms the previous assignment of the “ferritin gene” to chromosome 19 (Caskey et al. 1983). However, lines retaining chromosome 11 were found to contain human “H” type ferritin suggesting that the gene for the “H” subunit is on this chromosome. The presence of chromosome 6 was not necessary for the expression of either “H” or “L” type human ferritin. It thus seems unlikely that the gene for idiopathic haemochromatosis is a ferritin gene.