Human Genetics

, Volume 67, Issue 2, pp 183–186

Estimating the Recombination frequency for the PTC-Kell linkage

Authors

  • M. Anne-Spence
    • Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics and BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
  • Catherine T. Falk
    • Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute of the New York Blood Center
  • Katherine Neiswanger
    • Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics and BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
  • L. Leigh Field
    • Medical Genetics ClinicAlberta Children's Hospital
  • Mary L. Marazita
    • Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics and BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
  • F. H. AllenJr.
    • Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute of the New York Blood Center
  • Roger M. Siervogel
    • Department of Pediatrics, Fels Research InstituteWright State University
  • Alex F. Roche
    • Department of Pediatrics, Fels Research InstituteWright State University
  • Barbara F. Crandall
    • Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics and BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
  • Robert S. Sparkes
    • Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Medicine, Pediatrics and BiomathematicsUCLA School of Medicine
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF00272997

Cite this article as:
Anne-Spence, M., Falk, C.T., Neiswanger, K. et al. Hum Genet (1984) 67: 183. doi:10.1007/BF00272997

Summary

Two data sets are analyzed for linkage between the PTC and Kell blood group loci. The original report of close linkage for these loci was that of Conneally et al. (1976), where the maximum likelihood estimate of Θ was 0.05. These two new data sets give a combined maximum likelihood estimate of \(\hat \Theta\)m=f=0.28. Estimating the recombination frequency for the sexes separately gave \(\hat \Theta\)m=0.29, \(\hat \Theta\)f=0.23. The combined maximum likelihood estimate over all published data sets including this report is \(\hat \Theta\)m=f=0.14, \(\hat {\rm Z}\)max=8.94. There is statistically significant evidence of heterogeneity among the published studies.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984