Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 163, Issue 1, pp 48–56

Isolation and characterization of Dehalospirillum multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a tetrachloroethene-utilizing, strictly anaerobic bacterium

  • Heidrun Scholz-Muramatsu
  • Anke Neumann
  • Michael Meßmer
  • Edward Moore
  • Gabriele Diekert
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/BF00262203

Cite this article as:
Scholz-Muramatsu, H., Neumann, A., Meßmer, M. et al. Arch. Microbiol. (1995) 163: 48. doi:10.1007/BF00262203

Abstract

A strictly anaerobic bacterium dechlorinating tetrachloroethene (perchloroethylene, PCE) via trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) was isolated from activated sludge with pyruvate plus PCE as energy substrates. The organism, called Dehalospirillum multivorans, is a gram-negative spirillum that does not form spores. The G+C content of the DNA was 41.5 mol%. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, D. multivorans represents a new genus and a new species belonging to the epsilon subdivision of Proteobacteria. Quinones, cytochromes b and c, and corrinoids were extracted from the cells. D. multivorans grew in defined medium with PCE and H2 as sole energy sources and acetate as carbon source; the growth yield under these conditions was 1.4g of cell protein per mol chloride released. Alternatively to PCE, fumarate and nitrate could serve as electron acceptors; sulfate could not replace fumarate, nitrate, or PCE in this respect. In addition to H2, the organism utilized a variety of electron donors for dechlorination (pyruvate, lactate, ethanol, formate, glycerol). Upon growth on pyruvate plus PCE, the main fermentation products formed were acetatc, lactate, DCE, and H2. At optimal pH (7.3–7.6) and temperature (30°C), and in the presence of pyruvate (20mM) and PCE (160μM), a dechlorination rate of about 50 nmol min-1 (mg cell protein)-1 and a doubling time of about 2.5h were obtained with growing cultures. The ability to reduce PCE to DCE appears to be constitutive under the experimental conditions applied since cultures growing in the absence of PCE for several generations immediately started dechlorination when transferred to a medium containing PCE. The organism may be useful for bioremediation of environments polluted with tetrachloroethene.

Key words

Anaerobic dehalogenation Reductive dechlorination Perchloroethylene Tetrachloroethene Tetrachloroethene respiration cis-1,2-Dichloroethene Trichloroethene Dehalospirillum multivorans 

Abbreviations

PCE

Perchloroethylene, tetrachloroethene

TCE

Trichloroethene

DCE

cis-1,2-Dichloroethene

CHC

Chlorinated hydrocarbon

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heidrun Scholz-Muramatsu
    • 1
  • Anke Neumann
    • 2
  • Michael Meßmer
    • 2
  • Edward Moore
    • 3
  • Gabriele Diekert
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für SiedlungswasserbauUniversität StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  2. 2.Institut für MikrobiologieUniversität StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  3. 3.Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische ForschungBereich MikrobiologieBraunschweigGermany