Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 89, Issue 3, pp 473–477

Activity of primate putamen neurons is selective to the mode of voluntary movement: visually guided, self-initiated or memory-guided

  • M. Kimura
  • T. Aosaki
  • Y. Hu
  • A. Ishida
  • K. Watanabe
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00229870

Cite this article as:
Kimura, M., Aosaki, T., Hu, Y. et al. Exp Brain Res (1992) 89: 473. doi:10.1007/BF00229870
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Summary

The aim of this report was to investigate the neural processes of movement initiation and control in which the basal ganglia play an essential role. Single-neuron activity was recorded in the putamen of monkeys performing learned arm movements initiated in three different modes: sensorially guided, internally-timed self-initiated and memory guided. There were no significant differences in the magnitude and timing of both prime mover and supporting muscle activity between the three modes of movement. Over half of the task-related neurons showed strong activity in one of the three modes of movement initiation, but were only slightly activated in the other two modes. No clear preference for a particular movement mode was evident in the population of putamen neurons as a whole. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that there are heterogeneous groups of neurons in the putamen, and that each group of neurons participates in retrieving a different kind of information required for movement based on either external sensory events or on internally stored information.

Key words

Voluntary movement Putamen Context dependency Single-unit recording Trigger stimulus Monkey Basal ganglia 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kimura
    • 1
  • T. Aosaki
    • 1
  • Y. Hu
    • 1
  • A. Ishida
    • 1
  • K. Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyJichi Medical SchoolTochigi-kenJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Health and Sport SciencesOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

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