Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 93, Issue 3, pp 392–401

Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) in soybean: species diversity, inheritance, and near-isogenic line analysis

Authors

  • P. J. Maughan
    • Department of Crop and Soil Environmental SciencesVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • M. A. Saghai Maroof
    • Department of Crop and Soil Environmental SciencesVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • G. R. Buss
    • Department of Crop and Soil Environmental SciencesVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • G. M. Huestis
    • Department of Crop and Soil SciencesOregon State University
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00223181

Cite this article as:
Maughan, P.J., Saghai Maroof, M.A., Buss, G.R. et al. Theoret. Appl. Genetics (1996) 93: 392. doi:10.1007/BF00223181

Abstract

Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis is a PCR-based technique capable of detecting more than 50 independent loci in a single PCR reaction. The objectives of the present study were to: (1) assess the extent of AFLP variation in cultivated (Gycine max L. Merr.) and wild soybean (G. soja Siebold & Zucc.), (2) determine genetic relationships among soybean accessions using AFLP data, and (3) evaluate the usefulness of AFLPs as genetic markers. Fifteen AFLP primer pairs detected a total of 759 AFLP fragments in a sample of 23 accessions of wild and cultivated soybean, with an average of 51 fragments produced per primer pair per accession. Two-hundred and seventy four fragments (36% of the total observed) were polymorphic, among which 127 (17%) were polymorphic in G. max and 237 (31%) were polymorphic in G. soja. F2 segregation analysis of six AFLP fragments indicated that they segregate as stable Mendelian loci. The number of polymorphic loci detected per AFLP primer pair in a sample of 23 accessions ranged from 9 to 27. The AFLP phenotypic diversity values were greater in wild than in cultivated soybean. Cluster and principal component analyses using AFLP data clearly separated G. max and G. soja accessions. Within the G. max group, adapted soybean cultivars were tightly clustered, illustrating the relatively low genetic diversity present in cultivated soybean. AFLP analysis of four soybean near-isogenic lines (NILs) identified three AFLP markers putatively linked to a virus resistance gene from two sources. The capacity of AFLP analysis to detect thousands of independent genetic loci with minimal cost and time requirements makes them an ideal marker for a wide array of genetic investigations.

Key words

Phenotypic diversityGlycine maxGenetic mappingSoybean mosaic virus
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996