Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 209, Issue 1, pp 71–86

Studies on microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum

I. Classification and locomotion behavior
  • Wolfgang Gawlitta
  • Klaus V. Wolf
  • Hans-Ulrich Hoffmann
  • Wilhelm Stockem
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00219924

Cite this article as:
Gawlitta, W., Wolf, K.V., Hoffmann, HU. et al. Cell Tissue Res. (1980) 209: 71. doi:10.1007/BF00219924

Summary

Depending on the conditions of the axenic shuttle culture, microplasmodia of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum can be subdivided into three classes regarding fine structural organization and protoplasmic streaming activity: (a) spherical and rod-shaped types, (b) ameboid types, and (c) symmetrical types.

In ameboid microplasmodia, the motive force for the irregular protoplasmic streaming activity is generated by alternative contraction and relaxation of a membrane-associated layer, morphologically consisting exclusively of thin filaments (probably actin). The protoplasm flows along a hydraulic pressure gradient produced by the filament layer within limited regions of the cell periphery. In dumbbell-shaped microplasmodia the motive force for the regular protoplasmic shuttle streaming between the two spherical heads is generated both by volume changes of the peripheral cell region (caused by the contractile activity of the membrane-associated filament layer), and by volume changes of the internal cell membrane invagination system (caused by fibrils attached to the basal region of the invaginations). The development from the unordered protoplasmic streaming pattern and less complicated fine structural organization in ameboid microplasmodia to the highly organized protoplasmic shuttle streaming and the more complicated morphology in dumbbell-shaped microplasmodia can be explained by intermediate stages. Whereas the motive force for the transport of smaller amounts of protoplasm can be generated by the exclusive action of a cortical filament layer, the existence of a filament cortex, the display of cytoplasmic fibrils, and the development of plasma membrane invagination appear to be a necessary precondition for the transport of large amounts of protoplasm.

Key words

Microfilaments Protoplasmic streaming Microcinematography Microplasmodia Physarum polycephalum 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Gawlitta
    • 1
  • Klaus V. Wolf
    • 1
  • Hans-Ulrich Hoffmann
    • 1
  • Wilhelm Stockem
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Cytology, University of BonnBonnFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Institute for Cytology, University of BonnBonnFederal Republic of Germany