Journal of Paleolimnology

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 51–81

A late Holocene record of land-use history, soil erosion, lake trophy and lake-level fluctuations at Bjäresjösjön (south Sweden)

Authors

  • M.-J. Gaillard
    • Dept. of Quaternary GeologyUniversity of Lund
  • J. A. Dearing
    • Dept. of GeographyCoventry Polytechnic
  • F. El-Daoushy
    • Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of Uppsala
  • M. Enell
    • Swedish Environmental Research Institute
  • H. Håkansson
    • Dept. of Quaternary GeologyUniversity of Lund
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00201299

Cite this article as:
Gaillard, M., Dearing, J.A., El-Daoushy, F. et al. J Paleolimnol (1991) 6: 51. doi:10.1007/BF00201299

Abstract

Land-use history, soil erosion, lake trophy and lake-level fluctuations during the last 3000 years were reconstructed through a multidisciplinary palaeolimnological study (pollen, plant macrofossils, diatoms, physical and chemical analysis, magnetic measurements and radiometric methods) of a small eutrophic lake in southern Sweden (Bjäresjösjön, Scania). There are striking responses in diatom, chemical, sediment yield and magnetic records to land-use changes documented by pollen analysis or historical sources, and to lake-level changes identified from sedimentary changes. Our multidisciplinary approach assists interpretation of the processes controlling long-term changes and separation of the effects of different factors (land-use changes, lake-level fluctuations) on individual biostratigraphical records. Climate has controlled processes in the lake indirectly, through lake-level fluctuations, from the Late Bronze Age to the Viking Age (700 BC-AD 800). Since the Viking Age, land-use controlled most of the changes observed in the lake's development and soil erosion processes. Major changes in lake development occurred during the last 200 years, due to a drastic increase in soil erosion and water eutrophication during a period of agricultural modernization.

Key words

South SwedenLate Holocenecatchment historysoil erosionlake trophylake-level fluctuationspalaeolimnology
Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991