Solar Physics

, Volume 136, Issue 1, pp 89–104

The Bragg Crystal Spectrometer for SOLAR-A

  • J. L. Culhane
  • E. Hiei
  • G. A. Doschek
  • A. M. Cruise
  • Y. Ogawara
  • Y. Uchida
  • R. D. Bentley
  • C. M. Brown
  • J. Lang
  • T. Watanabe
  • J. A. Bowles
  • R. D. Deslattes
  • U. Feldman
  • A. Fludra
  • P. Guttridge
  • A. Henins
  • J. Lapington
  • J. Magraw
  • J. T. Mariska
  • J. Payne
  • K. J. H. Phillips
  • P. Sheather
  • K. Slater
  • K. Tanaka
  • E. Towndrow
  • M. W. Trow
  • A. Yamaguchi
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00151696

Cite this article as:
Culhane, J.L., Hiei, E., Doschek, G.A. et al. Sol Phys (1991) 136: 89. doi:10.1007/BF00151696

Abstract

The Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) is one of the instruments which makes up the scientific payload of the SOLAR-A mission. The spectrometer employs four bent germanium crystals, views the whole Sun and observes the resonance line complexes of H-like Fexxvi and He-like Fexxv, Caxix, and Sxv in four narrow wavelength ranges with a resolving power (λ/Δλ) of between 3000 and 6000. The spectrometer has approaching ten times better sensitivity than that of previous instruments thus permitting a time resolution of better than 1 s to be achieved. The principal aim is the measurement of the properties of the 10 to 50 million K plasma created in solar flares with special emphasis on the heating and dynamics of the plasma during the impulsive phase. This paper summarizes the scientific objectives of the BCS and describes the design, characteristics, and performance of the spectrometers.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Culhane
    • 1
  • E. Hiei
    • 2
  • G. A. Doschek
    • 3
  • A. M. Cruise
    • 4
  • Y. Ogawara
    • 5
  • Y. Uchida
    • 6
  • R. D. Bentley
    • 1
  • C. M. Brown
    • 3
  • J. Lang
    • 4
  • T. Watanabe
    • 2
  • J. A. Bowles
    • 1
  • R. D. Deslattes
    • 7
  • U. Feldman
    • 3
  • A. Fludra
    • 1
  • P. Guttridge
    • 1
  • A. Henins
    • 7
  • J. Lapington
    • 1
  • J. Magraw
    • 4
  • J. T. Mariska
    • 3
  • J. Payne
    • 4
  • K. J. H. Phillips
    • 4
  • P. Sheather
    • 1
  • K. Slater
    • 4
  • K. Tanaka
    • 2
  • E. Towndrow
    • 4
  • M. W. Trow
    • 1
  • A. Yamaguchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College LondonHolmburyU.K.
  2. 2.National Astronomical Observatory of JapanTokyoJapan
  3. 3.US Naval Research LaboratoryWashington, D.C.U.S.A.
  4. 4.Rutherford Appleton LaboratoryAbingdonU.K.
  5. 5.Institute of Space and Astronautical ScienceTokyoJapan
  6. 6.University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  7. 7.National Institute for Standards and TechnologyWashington, D.C.U.S.A.