Landscape Ecology

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 63–69

Resource utilization scales and landscape pattern

  • R. V. O'Neill
  • B. T. Milne
  • M. G. Turner
  • R. H. Gardner
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00138908

Cite this article as:
O'Neill, R.V., Milne, B.T., Turner, M.G. et al. Landscape Ecol (1988) 2: 63. doi:10.1007/BF00138908

Abstract

The spatial patterning of resources constrains the movement of consumers on the landscape. Percolation theory predicts that an organism can move freely if its critical resource or habitat occupies 59.28% of the landscape. Sparse resources require an organism to operate on larger resource utilization scales. Multiple critical resources necessitate larger scales, while substitutable resources ease the scale requirements. Contagious spatial patterns require larger scales to permit movement between resource clusters. The study indicates a strong link between spatial pattern and ecological processes on a landscape.

Keywords

percolation theory probability theory landscape ecology scale pattern 

Copyright information

© SPB Academic Publishing bv 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. V. O'Neill
    • 1
  • B. T. Milne
    • 2
  • M. G. Turner
    • 1
  • R. H. Gardner
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Sciences DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.Biology DepartmentUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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