Ecotoxicology

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 103–114

Contaminant concentrations in Illinois mink and otter

Authors

  • Richard S. Halbrook
    • Cooperative Wildlife Research LaboratorySouthern Illinois University
    • Department of ZoologySouthern Illinois University
  • A. Woolf
    • Cooperative Wildlife Research LaboratorySouthern Illinois University
    • Department of ZoologySouthern Illinois University
  • G. F. HubertJr
    • Illinois Department of Natural Resources
  • S. Ross
    • Animal Disease Laboratory
  • W. E. Braselton
    • Animal Health Diagnostic LaboratoryMichigan State University
Papers

DOI: 10.1007/BF00119049

Cite this article as:
Halbrook, R.S., Woolf, A., Hubert, G.F. et al. Ecotoxicology (1996) 5: 103. doi:10.1007/BF00119049

Mink and otters are valuable wildlife resources and management efforts in North America and Europe have been directed towards re-establishing extirpated populations or expanding existing populations. The similarity of otter and mink habits and trophic status may allow inferences about the suitability of the habitat that is occupied by one species (mink) for the other species that is absent (otter). Remnant otter populations in Illinois have not expanded even though suitable habitat appears to be available and is occupied by mink. Low contaminant concentrations in tissues of mink trapped in a habitat where otters are not found and metal and organochlorine concentrations in tissues of otters incidentally collected by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, suggest that environmental contaminants should not hinder natural expansion of otters in Illinois.

Keywords

mink (Mustela vision) otter (Lutra canadensis) metals organochlorines

Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996