Genetica

, Volume 97, Issue 2, pp 205–210

Abnormal development of the locomotor activity in yellow larvae of Drosophila: a cuticular defect?

Authors

  • Nibaldo C. Inestrosa
    • Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias BiológicasPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  • Claudio E. Sunkel
    • Molecular Gnetics LaboratoryUniversity of Oporto
  • Jorge Arriagada
    • Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias BiológicasPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  • Jorge Garrido
    • Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias BiológicasPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  • Raul Godoy-Herrera
    • Departamento de Biología Celular y Genética, Facultad de MedicinaUniversidad de Chile
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00054627

Cite this article as:
Inestrosa, N.C., Sunkel, C.E., Arriagada, J. et al. Genetica (1996) 97: 205. doi:10.1007/BF00054627

Abstract

The yellow (y) mutation of Drosophila melanogaster affects the development of behavior and morphology. We have analyzed some behavioral and morphological parameters during the development of y mutants. Wild-type third instar larvae move in straighter paths than larvae of the same age homozygous for the y mutation. At 96 h of age, the tracks of y larvae have 10 times as many loops as tracks of wild-type larvae, and at 120 h of age, y larvae show bending behavior about 2.5 times more frequently than do wild-type. Consequently, they do not disperse as much as wild-type larvae. Concomitant with the behavioral changes, the larvae present a defect in the morphology of large chaetae in the larval denticle belts, particularly of 2nd and 3rd instars, both with light and scanning electron microscopes. These results suggest that a cuticular defect is probably involved in the abnormal locomotor activity observed in y larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

Key words

Drosophila melanogastercuticular structureslarvaeyellow genelocomotor behavior
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996