Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 183–187

Changes in cell wall polysaccharides in the internodes of submerged floating rice

  • Tetsushi Azuma
  • Yoriko Sumida
  • Yasushi Kaneda
  • Naotsugu Uchida
  • Takeshi Yasuda
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00024584

Cite this article as:
Azuma, T., Sumida, Y., Kaneda, Y. et al. Plant Growth Regul (1996) 19: 183. doi:10.1007/BF00024584

Abstract

In excised stem segments of floating rice (Oryza sativa L.), as well as in intact plants, submergence greatly stimulates the elongation of internodes. The differences in the composition of cell wall polysaccharides along the highest internodes of submerged and air-grown stem segments were examined. The newly elongated parts of internodes that had been submerged for two days contained considerably less cellulosic and noncellulosic polysaccharides than air-grown internodes, an indication that the cell walls of the newly elongated parts of submerged internodes are extremely thin. In the young parts of both air-grown and submerged internodes, the relative amounts of noncellulosic polysaccharides were equal to those of α-cellulose, whereas the relative amounts of α-cellulose were higher than those of noncellulosic polysaccharides in the upper, old parts. In the cell-elongation zones of both air-grown and submerged internodes, glucose was predominant among the noncellulosic neutral sugars of cell wall. The relative amount of glucose in noncellulosic neutral sugars decreased toward the upper, old parts of internodes, whereas that of xylose increased.

Key words

cell wall polysaccharides deepwater rice floating rice internodal elongation Oryza sativa submergence 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsushi Azuma
    • 1
  • Yoriko Sumida
    • 2
  • Yasushi Kaneda
    • 2
  • Naotsugu Uchida
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takeshi Yasuda
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKobe UniversityKobeJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureKobe UniversityKobeJapan

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