Hydrobiologia

, Volume 320, Issue 1, pp 27–44

Distribution of crustacean diapause: micro- and macroevolutionary pattern and process

  • Nelson G. HairstonJr.
  • Carla E. Cáceres
Evolutionary Aspects of Diapause in Crustacea

DOI: 10.1007/BF00016802

Cite this article as:
Hairston, N.G. & Cáceres, C.E. Hydrobiologia (1996) 320: 27. doi:10.1007/BF00016802

Abstract

Theoretical predictions for the relationships between duration of dormancy, reproductive life span, and dispersal ability developed for plants in temporally varying environments are applied here to crustaceans. Mathematical models suggest that diapause duration should negatively covary with adult life span, and that both diapause and life span should negatively covary with dispersal ability. A survey of 167 crustacean species from 20 orders and three classes confirms that species with prolonged diapause have short adult life spans and those with long adult lives either have diapause lasting less than a year, or do not diapause at all. Prolonged diapause is more common among small or inland water crustaceans than it is among large or marine species, whereas large or marine species have significantly longer adult life spans on average than do those that are small or from inland waters. A greater fraction of species in the Branchiopoda exhibit prolonged diapause than do members of the Maxillopoda which, in turn, are more likely to exhibit prolonged diapause than are the Malacostraca. A greater fraction of malacostracan species have adult life spans exceeding one year than do species in either the Branchiopoda or the Maxillopoda. Cladistic analysis shows that phylogenetic constraint is likely to be at least in part responsible for the expression of diapause among the Crustacea. We conclude that both natural selection and macroevolutionary pattern have influenced the distribution of diapause among modern crustaceans.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nelson G. HairstonJr.
    • 1
  • Carla E. Cáceres
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Ecology and SystematicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA