Plant and Soil

, Volume 165, Issue 1, pp 161–169

Carbon cost of root systems: an architectural approach

  • Kai L. Nielsen
  • Jonathan P. Lynch
  • Andrei G. Jablokow
  • Peter S. Curtis
Modelling

DOI: 10.1007/BF00009972

Cite this article as:
Nielsen, K.L., Lynch, J.P., Jablokow, A.G. et al. Plant Soil (1994) 165: 161. doi:10.1007/BF00009972

Abstract

Root architecture is an important component of nutrient uptake and may be sensitive to carbon allocational changes brought about by rising CO2. We describe a deformable geometric model of root growth, SimRoot, for the dynamic morphological and physiological simulation of root architectures. Using SimRoot, and measurements of root biomass deposition, respiration and exudation, carbon/phosphorus budgets were developed for three contrasting root architectures. Carbon allocation patterns and phosphorus acquisition efficiencies were estimated for Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings with either a dichotomous, herringbone, or empirically determined bean root architecture. Carbon allocation to biomass, respiration, and exudation varied significantly among architectures. Root systems also varied in the relationship between C expenditure and P acquisition, providing evidence for the importance of architecture in nutrient acquisition efficiency.

Key words

carbon cost phosphorus Phaseolus vulgaris root architecture root growth root simulation model 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai L. Nielsen
    • 1
  • Jonathan P. Lynch
    • 1
  • Andrei G. Jablokow
    • 2
  • Peter S. Curtis
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant BiologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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